Hull food charity reveals huge rise in demand from struggling families

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A CHARITY that provides food to the most needy in East Yorkshire has seen a massive increase in demand.
FareShare Hull and Humber, which is run by the Goodwin Trust in the region, says there has been a 53 per cent increase in charities and groups seeking food to help struggling families.
The organisation has provided charities with food for more than 363,000 meals in the past year and is now supporting 89 charities to help meet demand.

A total of 4,270 people received food every day last year from the charity – up from 2,780 in 2012.

Those affected by homelessness are still the highest beneficiaries, but the number of children and families receiving help through breakfast clubs, youth centres and community cafés has doubled in the past year, now accounting for a quarter of all people receiving help.

JJ Tatten, of the Goodwin Development Trust, said: “These official figures confirm what we’ve known for some time – that the issue of food poverty is a rapidly worsening situation in our region due to the emergence of the plight of the working poor.

“This, coupled with the perfect social storm of unemployment and benefits cuts, has resulted in soaring dependency on FareShare food.”

FareShare Hull and Humber is part of the national charity FareShare, which supports 1,296 charities and community projects across the UK and has provided them with enough food for one million meals a month in the past year.
Janine White helps run the Preston Road Families Association and says she relies heavily on help from FareShare.
She said: “The charity gives us so many trays of food and often extras when it can.

“We then hand out food parcels to those who need them in the area.

“We have seen a large increase in those receiving Jobseeker’s Allowance being sanctioned, meaning their benefits are stopped for whatever reason, leaving them with nothing to live on for weeks at a time.

“There is no question we are seeing a huge increase in demand. I would say demand has tripled in the past six months.
“We are helping about ten people a week on average and provide them with breakfast and at least one more meal a day.
“We are all volunteers and don’t get paid, so we rely on the likes of FareShare.”

The majority of food supplied by FareShare is surplus, meaning it would have otherwise gone to waste.
This food is all in-date but has become surplus as a result of labelling errors, damaged packaging or not meeting specifications.
FareShare Hull and Humber received 237 tonnes of food in the past year, 85 per cent of which was surplus.

Lindsay Boswell, CEO of FareShare, said: “The trends are alarming. We’re supporting more people and more charities than ever and while we hear the economy is recovering, we know it will always be hardest for the most vulnerable in society to regularly access food.”
East Hull MP Karl Turner said: “We are seeing a growing cost of living crisis that is pushing families into severe hardship.

“Rising food poverty is a national scandal and six in ten people say they are worried about how they will be able to manage their future spending on groceries.
“Despite claims of a recovering economy, a 53 per cent increase in the use of FareShare in Hull shows that the recovery may be helping some but not the majority.
“I hope the Chancellor will use this week’s budget to address issues such as the unfair bedroom tax, which is forcing more families to turn to food banks.”

Read more: http://www.hulldailymail.co.uk/Hull-food-charity-reveals-huge-rise-demand/story-20822621-detail/story.html#ixzz2x1Znp4jI

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FareShare takes food poverty fight to Westminster

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FareShare’s fight against food poverty has been taken right to the House of Commons. Karl Turner MP (East Hull) has submitted an Early Day Motion to Parliament, calling on all MPs to work with FareShare and the food industry to alleviate food poverty through the distribution of surplus food.

Mr Turner, who is the patron of FareShare Hull, offered to submit the EDM on behalf of the food charity following a FareShare event last month which highlighted the rapidly worsening food poverty crisis in the Humber region. Many local food companies attended the event and pledged their support to FareShare Hull in terms of food donations, advice and equipment.

Mr Turner said: “MPs, councillors and community leaders should be showing leadership on this issue and work with FareShare, community groups and the food industry to alleviate levels of food poverty. Food businesses should also recognise the role they can play in alleviating food poverty by working with FareShare to distribute surplus food to those in need.”

FareShare chief executive Lindsay Boswell said: “The demand for our services has grown dramatically, 59 per cent in the past 12 months, and we estimate that we handle less than 0.1 per cent of the surplus food available. We desperately need more responsible food companies to work with us. If just one per cent of the surplus food in the UK was given to FareShare, we could provide 70 million meals for people in need.”

If you are a food company interested in donating food to FareShare then please contact JJ Tatten on 01482 587550 or email jtatten@goodwin-centre.org

http://www.goodwintrust.org/news/fareshare-takes-food-poverty-fight-to-westminster/

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Heron Foods donates chiller van to FareShare in Hull

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A FOOD company has rushed to the aid of a charity handing out parcels to the hungry and needy.

FareShare in Hull had two chiller vans to distribute food to homeless groups and community centres but one broke down beyond repair earlier this summer .

The charity desperately needed a replacement van to get back on the road and, after an appeal for help in the Mail, Heron Foods came forward.

The company donated one of their chiller vans and even put FareShare branding on it for free.

JJ Tatten, of Goodwin Development Trust, which operates the FareShare scheme, said: “It really warms your heart to know that people care.

“It was a real community effort – the project is run by local volunteers, it helps local charities, our local newspaper helped us appeal for a van and a local company came to our rescue.

“It proves the network works if you’re willing to ask.”

FareShare distributes to about 80 organisations in the Hull and East Riding area from its warehouse in Sutton Fields.

It receives surplus food from top- name brands and supermarkets, including Sainsbury’s, Jackson’s and Marks & Spencers.

There is nothing wrong with the food, but the companies sometimes have to throw out products if they have an incorrect barcode, a wrong label or the line has been discontinued.

If it was not donated to FoodShare, it would most probably end up in a landfill, as it cannot be sold in shops.

Heron commercial director Mike Igoe said the company was pleased to help out.

He said: “We’re a discount food shop, so we understand the importance of making every pound stretch as far as it can go.

“We recognise there are some people in such difficult circumstances they have to rely on foodbanks and schemes like FareShare, so we’re happy to help in that respect.”

Mr Igoe was given a tour of the Sutton Fields warehouse this week and met some of the volunteers involved in the scheme.

He said: “They have a great army of volunteers all working hard.

“It was good to see young lads gaining experience and working hard, rather than sitting about.

“We want to look at how we can continue our relationship with FareShare in the future and hopefully help them in other ways, too.”

Read more: http://www.hulldailymail.co.uk/Heron-Foods-donates-chiller-van-FareShare-Hull/story-20039282-detail/story.html#ixzz2wpLaJzs3

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FareShare collections in Hull and East Riding help feed thousands of poor families

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GENEROUS shoppers have helped to feed thousands of people who cannot afford food.

A food drive held this weekend showed how generous the region’s people are, with donations even coming from those who are themselves struggling financially.

FareShare in Hull teamed up with Tesco stores from Friday to Sunday to encourage shoppers to put extra non- perishable food items in their basket.

The items were collected to send out to organisations that distribute food to families who cannot afford to buy their own.

JJ Tatten, of the Goodwin Development Trust, which helps run the FareShare scheme in Hull, was with volunteer collectors at the north Hull Tesco store.

He said: “What always strikes me about the people of Hull is that they are incredibly generous.

“There was an endless stream of people happy to donate food, sometimes in extremely large quantities.

“The difference this year, though, compared with our campaigns in previous years, is that people were openly talking about their own struggles.

“People were telling us they couldn’t afford to give anything because they could barely afford to feed themselves.”

Mr Tatten spoke of one woman who was reduced to tears, revealing her own poverty meant she struggled to afford meals.

He said: “She very eloquently explained to me the situation she was in.

“In telling me, she became very upset and embarrassed.

“She kept using the word ‘embarrassed’ and I kept trying to tell her there was nothing to feel embarrassed about.

“She was having a bad run of luck and it wasn’t her fault she was in that particular situation.”

But despite the number of families who struggle to provide food for the table, many were willing to give whatever they could to the collections.

“Very elderly people with walking sticks and disabled people, who themselves are under the cosh with the changes in welfare, were still stepping up to the mark,” said Mr Tatten.

“A lot of people spoke very strongly of their feelings of solidarity with those who are struggling.

“They were appalled about the situations some people find themselves in and were desperately keen to do something about it.”

FareShare’s collections took place in Tesco stores across the region, with volunteers helping out in Withernsea, Market Weighton, Driffield, Goole, Hornsea, Bridlington and Hull.

MPs Karl Turner and Diana Johnson volunteered at the Hall Road store in Hull on Friday.

However, FareShare also receives surplus foods from brand-name giants, including Tesco and Marks & Spencer.

Mr Tatten said: “Although our collection drive is over now, there are other ways people can help us to combat food poverty.

“We’re looking for volunteers for our distribution warehouse in Sutton Fields.

“We’d also be grateful to hear from anyone who would like to donate money for petrol for our distribution vans, or for our utility bills, as it takes a lot of electricity to store the food and keep it cool.”

Anyone wishing to help can call 01482 587550 and ask to be put through to the FareShare team or JJ Tatten.

Read more: http://www.bridlingtonpeople.co.uk/FareShare-collections-Hull-East-Riding-help-feed/story-20252217-detail/story.html#ixzz2wpKbB9dH

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Hull people urged to help their own and donate food to FareShare project

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A CHARITY’S biggest ever food drive is launched today, to help poor families in Hull and the East Riding.

FareShare in Hull says thousands of families are suffering the burden of debt in the city and can barely afford to put meals on the table.

Today, FareShare schemes across the country are teaming up with Tesco stores to appeal for donations of food.

It comes just two days after Hull was dubbed one of the most debt-ridden cities in the country, with 43 per cent of adults struggling to make ends meet.

JJ Tatten, of Goodwin Development Trust, which operates the city’s FareShare scheme, said: “We collect food at our warehouse in Sutton Fields, where it is then distributed to organisations across Hull.

“At one venue in the city, they had 46 people queuing for food one morning.

“That really brings home what we’re doing – it is shocking so many people in Hull are living like this.

“People are struggling with money, as the news this week shows, so it is also safe to assume that part of those debt problems include struggles to pay for food.”

FareShare in Hull distributes to about 80 organisations in the Hull and East Riding area from its warehouse.

It receives surplus food from top-name brands and supermarkets, including Jackson’s and Marks & Spencer.

There is nothing wrong with the food, but the companies sometimes have to throw out products with problems – such as incorrect barcodes, wrong labels or if a line has been discontinued.

If it was not donated to FareShare, it would probably end up in a landfill, as it cannot be sold in shops.

Mr Tatten said: “To help us with our drive, on Friday, Saturday and Sunday we’re doing a big drive at Tesco stores.

“There will be drop-off points at all Tesco stores, but we will have a team of volunteers giving out advice and leaflets at the stores in Hall Road, north Hull, Bridlington, Driffield, Withernsea and Market Weighton.

“Previous campaigns have shown three volunteers can raise half a tonne of food in a three-hour shift.

“That equates to 1,190 meals, so it does make a difference having volunteers at the stores.

“We need as many people as possible to donate non-perishable foods, such as tinned goods or dry pasta.”

To help raise the profile of the campaign, MPs Karl Turner and Diana Johnson will both be helping out at the Hall Road store in Hull today.

Mr Turner is a patron of FareShare Humber while Ms Johnson is the MP for the Hull North constituency.

Read more: http://www.bridlingtonpeople.co.uk/Hull-people-urged-help-donate-food-FareShare/story-20239284-detail/story.html#ixzz2wpJzEZ7B

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Call for action tackling ‘travesty’ of waste food

HULL politician Karl Turner has called for action after a report revealed up to half the world’s food is thrown away.

The report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IME) suggests poor storage, strict sell-by dates, bulk offers and consumer fussiness is leading to a mountain of food being thrown out.

Mr Turner, MP for Hull East, said it was a “travesty” so much food was being wasted “given that so many people are going without meals”.

Now, he is backing a call by charity FareShare for the food industry to divert surplus food for distribution to people in need.

FareShare works with more than 700 grassroots charities to help people in need.

The Labour MP, who is a FareShare patron in Hull, said the charity played a “critical role” in addressing food poverty by making use of “surplus food fit for human consumption”.

He said: “MPs, councillors and community leaders should be showing leadership on this issue and work with FareShare, community groups and the food industry to alleviate levels of food poverty.

“Food businesses should also recognise the role they can play in alleviating food poverty by working with FareShare to distribute surplus food to those in need.”

There has been a six-fold increase in the use of food banks – distributing food to families on low incomes – over the past three years, sparking widespread concern.

Earlier this week, the Prime Minister was repeatedly pressed about the problem by MPs during Question Time in Parliament.

FareShare chief executive Lindsay Boswell said: “Last year, we redistributed 3,600 tonnes of surplus food that helped feed 36,500 people in need every day. But we have a mountain to climb.

“The demand for our services has grown dramatically, 59 per cent in the past 12 months, and we estimate that we handle less than 0.1 per cent of the surplus food available.

“We desperately need more responsible food companies to work with us. If just one per cent of the surplus food in the UK was given to FareShare, we could provide 70 million meals for people in need.”

According to the IME report Global Food: Waste Not, Want Not, as much as half the world’s food, two billion tonnes, is wasted.

The study claimed up to 30 per cent of vegetables in the UK were not harvested because of their physical appearance, while half the food bought in Europe was simply thrown away.

Read more: http://legacy.thisishullandeastriding.co.uk/action-tackling-travesty-waste-food/story-17852723-detail/story.html#ixzz2wpJoKHl3

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FareShare charity ensuring no one has to go without food this festive season

HUNGRY people queue outside food banks in Hull every week hoping to get a hot bowl of soup or a pasta dish to get them through the day.

National charity FareShare has been running operations in the city for the past year and already has 60 community food members who receive meals through the scheme to distribute to the needy and vulnerable.

Food poverty has been associated with developing countries in the past but the harsh reality in Britain is that more people are going hungry as they struggle to make their money stretch.

The city’s MPs, councillors and leading business people met to find out more about the FareShare initiative at the charity’s Malmo Park depot.

JJ Tatten, of the Goodwin Development Trust, which operates FareShare in Hull, said: “The amount of parents skipping meals to feed their children is astonishing.

“The worst thing is there is such a stigma attached to this sort of thing there are probably even more people struggling than we think.

“There are about 30 more community food members wanting to get involved, we just haven’t had enough food coming in to meet the demand, but that is changing.”

According to the Save The Children charity, one in four parents has missed a meal in the past year in order to feed their children.

The figures claim poverty – going without food, new clothes, and struggling to pay for fuel and rent – affects a quarter of all young people.

East Hull MP Karl Turner called the situation “terrible” and has been involved in collecting FareShare goods at a Sainsbury’s store in Hessle.

He said: “The scheme is brilliant and the Goodwin Trust have managed to get stakeholders really involved and interested in this.

“It’s hard to say no to them.

“The people who have donated through FareShare events are also very generous and they don’t just leave you with a tin of baked beans, they fill their basket and spend at least £5.

“Food banks aren’t just for Christmas. We need to get more people involved in the FareShare scheme to help people who are seriously struggling.”

MP for Hull West and Hessle, Alan Johnson, said people on JobSeeker’s Allowance are finding it difficult to make their money last seven days and rising food prices is one reason they are turning to handouts from charities.

He said: “Supporting initiatives like this is crucial and we come across this problem time and time again.

“I applaud the businesses who are involved in FareShare.”

The William Jackson Food Group in Hull is one of a number of companies donating food to disadvantaged people in the city.

David Garbutt, head of procurement at Aunt Bessies, which is part of the food group, said: “Our work with the charity is gaining momentum and we supply bread from Jackson’s Bakery as and when it is requested. There is a stream of food we could send in the direction of FareShare and we are also looking at sending over apple pies.

“We want to help the community in which we work in and this is one way of doing our bit.”

Cargill, an international marketer of food, also supports the charity in many ways including volunteer support and sharing expertise in logistics and health and safety.

Chrissy Sheppard, volunteer co-ordinator at the Goodwin Development Trust, said there are about 28 people helping to send food to organisations in the city.

She said: “They do everything from driving to admin.

“We’ve had quite a few people find permanent work after volunteering for FareShare. We are looking for more volunteers as well as more people to come on board and donate food to the charity.”

Pat Doyle, chairman of Emmaus Hull, volunteers at St Charles Church drop-in and gave a humbling account of his experiences with the homeless and families in need.

He said: “We are supported by FareShare and offer out pasta, rice, sandwiches and soup at two drop-in sessions a week.

“On a Tuesday, it is always busier than a Friday because people are struggling after their benefits have ran out.

“We have about 80 people in some days and the most we have had is 93.

“Last week, we had about 60 people queuing up outside for us opening up at 10am.

“It’s awful to see and we’ve even had three pregnant girls in.

“Some of the young men are so hungry, they eat about six bowls of soup.

“These people really benefit from FareShare’s donations and we are not here to judge, we just want to help them regardless of their circumstances.

“Recently, one lad asked for a razor and some cleaning products at the drop-in and while he was having a shave, he told me: ‘One thing that will never be taken away from me is my self respect’.”

Read more: http://legacy.thisishullandeastriding.co.uk/FareShare-charity-ensuring-food-festive-season/story-17532066-detail/story.html#ixzz2wpJcJF9e

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